events

Flash Talks Part 1

DNAC Seminar Series
Various, Duke University
Come and hear a variety of talks on research that is currently being working on! We hope these discussions help spark new ideas and future collaborations over the course of the semester!
September, 26 2016 | 12:30 p.m. - 2:00 p.m. | Gross Hall 230E

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Past Events

What is really online? Bias, sampling, and platform error in online networks.

DNAC Seminar Series
Ian McCulloh, Johns Hopkins, Applied Physics Lab
There has been a recent increase in the use and study of online data, such as social media. Several scientists have explored the differences between online data and offline data that is traditionally used in social science research. This talk will revie
April, 25 2016 | 12:30 p.m. - 2:00 p.m. | 270 Gross Hall

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Multiple Team Membership and Team Performance: The Moderating Effect of Time Fragmentation

DNAC Seminar Series
Joost van de Brake & Jonathon Cummings, Groningen, Economics and Business & Duke, Fuqua
Knowledge-intensive work is increasingly carried out by teams whose members are also involved other teams. Multiple team membership (MTM) can increase a focal teams’ performance when members are able to access relevant knowledge from their other teams.
April, 18 2016 | 12:30 p.m. - 2:00 p.m. | 270 Gross Hall

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Spontaneous Social Conventions: An Experimental Study of Cultural Evolution

DNAC Seminar Series
Damon Centola, U Pennsylvania, Communications
Social conventions are the foundation of social cooperation and productive economic activity, yet very little is known about how and when they form. Prominent theories argue that widely shared social conventions depend up on coordinating mechanisms, such
April, 4 2016 | 12:30 p.m. - 2:00 p.m. | 270 Gross Hall

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Social-Ecological Networks – an emerging transdisciplinary approach to study social-ecological systems

DNAC Seminar Series
Örjan Bodin, Stockholm Resilience Centre
The network perspective is increasingly put forth as an analytical framework well suited to studying complex social-ecological systems. The underlying rationale is that the network approach as such is generic and allows the research to model any kind of s
March, 28 2016 | 12:30 p.m. - 2:00 p.m. | 270 Gross Hall

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Community fission, cohesion, and a “Four-Year War” in two populations of wild chimpanzees

DNAC Seminar Series
Joseph Feldblum, Duke, Evolutionary Anthropology
In 1973, researchers in Gombe National Park, Tanzania, observed the only apparent example of community fission in wild chimpanzees. Over the next four years, males of the northern daughter community killed all adult males and one female of the southern co
March, 21 2016 | 12:30 p.m. - 2:00 p.m. | Grosss Hall 270

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Bayesian Network–Response Regression

DNAC Seminar Series
Lu Wang, Duke, Statistical Science
It is of increasing interest to learn how the human brain network varies as a function of continuous features, but flexible procedures to accomplish this goal are limited. We develop a Bayesian semiparametric model, which combines low-rank factorizations
March, 7 2016 | 12:30 p.m. - 2:00 p.m. | 270 Gross Hall

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Studying the Structure of Attitudes with Belief Network Analysis

DNAC Seminar Series
Andrei Boutyline, UC at Berkeley, Sociology
Theories of the structure of political belief systems typically conceive of them as networks of interrelated opinions, in which some beliefs are central and others are derived from these more fundamental positions. In this paper, we formally show how such
February, 29 2016 | 12:30 p.m. - 2:00 p.m. | 270 Gross Hall

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Integrating brokerage and closure in a general model of social capital: from bridges, to embedding, to guanxi

DNAC Seminar Series
Ron Burt, U Chicago, Sociology and Strategy

February, 22 2016 | 12:30 p.m. - 2:00 p.m. | 270 Gross Hall

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Naming the Gender Binary: a Machine Learning Approach to Analyzing Gendered Aesthetics

DNAC Seminar Series
Charles Seguin, UNC at Chapel Hill, Sociology
New children’s names are constantly introduced, and old names are continually rising or falling in popularity, yet these names continue to maintain a rigid separation between genders. This gender binary in children’s names exemplifies a more general
February, 15 2016 | 12:30 p.m. - 2:00 p.m. | Gross Hall 230E

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Testing and estimation for relational data

DNAC Seminar Series
Alex Volfovsky, Harvard, Statistics
Recent years have seen a dramatic rise in social media, networks, and other settings in which the relationships and interactions between individuals, countries or objects are observed. These types of relational data are often represented as a square matri
February, 8 2016 | 12:30 p.m. - 2:00 p.m. | 270 Gross Hall

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Are cohesive, integrated neighborhoods possible?

DNAC Seminar Series
Zack Neal, Michigan State, Psychology
There is a wealth of empirical evidence that there is a negative relationship between neighborhood spatial integration and social cohesion. The most segregated neighborhoods tend to be the most cohesive, while more integrated neighborhoods tend to be mor
February, 1 2016 | 12:30 p.m. - 2:00 p.m. | 230E Gross Hall

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Topic Areas, Gender, and Citation in Philosophy, 1993-2013

DNAC Seminar Series
Kieran Healy, Duke, Sociology

January, 25 2016 | 12:30 p.m. - 2:00 p.m. | 230E Gross Hall

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Symbolic Boundaries and Peer Influence on Alcohol Use

DNAC Seminar Series
Stephen Vaisey, Duke, Sociology
Peer influence is a fundamental process in social life. Network scientists generally conceptualize influence as an additive vector of forces, with increasing exposure to the behavior or attitudes of others associated with a greater likelihood of adopting
November, 9 2015 | 12:30 p.m. - 2:00 p.m. | 230E Gross Hall

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Bayesian Analysis of Dynamic Linear Topic Models

DNAC Seminar Series
Chris Glynn, Duke, Statistics
In dynamic text analysis, the proportion of a document characterized by a semantic topic may depend on the time trend of that topic’s overall prevalence and covariates of the document itself. We extend the Dynamic Topic Model of Blei and Lafferty (2006)
November, 2 2015 | 12:30 p.m. - 2:00 p.m. | 230E Gross Hall

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Ideological diversity in news and opinion on Facebook

DNAC Seminar Series
Solomon Messing, Pew Research Center's Data Labs
Exposure to news, opinion, and civic information increasingly occurs through social media. How do these online networks influence exposure to perspectives that cut across ideological lines? Using deidentified data, we examined how 10.1 million U.S. Facebo
October, 26 2015 | 12:30 p.m. - 2:00 p.m. | 230E Gross Hall

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Tensor regression for dynamic network data

DNAC Seminar Series
Peter Hoff, University of Washington-Seattle, Statistics and Biostatistics
A fundamental aspect of relational data, such as from a social network, is the possibility of dependence among the relations. In particular, the relations between members of one pair of nodes may have an effect on the relations between members of another
October, 19 2015 | 12:30 p.m. - 2:00 p.m. | 230E Gross Hall

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Statistical Inference for Networks via Spectral Embedding

DNAC Seminar Series
Dan Sussman, Harvard, Statistics
In this talk we will discuss using spectral methods for network analysis. We will show how a spectral embedding provides consistent estimates for latent positions in the random dot product graph model. This leads to accurate subsequent inference for a var
September, 28 2015 | 12:30 p.m. - 2:00 p.m. | 230E Gross Hall

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Fox News Network Data Analysis: Bayesian Dynamic Modeling

DNAC Seminar Series
Kaoru Irie, Duke, Statistics
We propose a Bayesian approach to analyze data on Internet traffic flow among Fox News websites. The observations are time-varying counts (non-negative integers), so the straightforward application of existing Gaussian-type state-space models is not avail
September, 21 2015 | 12:30 p.m. - 2:00 p.m. | 230E Gross Hall

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Can We Agree on Science? Measuring the Ideological Alignment of Science with Book Co-purchase Data

DNAC Seminar Series
Bill Shi, University of Chicago, Computation Institute

September, 14 2015 | 12:30 p.m. - 2:00 p.m. | 230E Gross Hall

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The Dynamics of Social Influence and Relational Reputation

DNAC Seminar Series
Sinan Aral, MIT, Management
Identity and reputation drive some of the most important relational decisions we make online: Who to follow or link to, whose information to trust, whose opinion to rely on when choosing a product or service, whose content to consume and share. Yet, we kn
April, 20 2015 | 12:30 - 14:00 | Gross Hall 230E

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Social space diffusion

DNAC Seminar Series
Jacob Fisher, Duke, Sociology
Social networks represent two different facets of social life: (1) stable paths for diffusion, or the spread of something through a connected population, and (2) random draws from an underlying social space, which indicate the relative positions of the pe
April, 13 2015 | 12:30 - 14:00 | Gross Hall 230E

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Dynamics of Autonomous Boolean Networks

DNAC Seminar Series
Otti D'Huys, Duke, Physics
Dynamics of Autonomous Boolean Networks
April, 6 2015 | 12:30 - 14:00 | Gross Hall 230E

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Forged in the Heat of Battle: New Organizations as Business Incubators

DNAC Seminar Series
Tiantian Yang, Duke, Sociology
Freeman’s (1986) provocative idea that entrepreneurs arise from existing organizations and are thus organizational products represented a watershed moment in research on entrepreneurship. His path-breaking idea called attention to the intersection of or
March, 30 2015 | 12:30 - 14:00 | Gross Hall 230E

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Visualisation Day

DNAC Seminar Series
the group,
The goal of this workshop is to puzzle through some aspects of data analysis/manipulation common to network analysis.
March, 23 2015 | 12:30 - 14:00 | Gross Hall 230E

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Persistence and Re-Formation of Close Personal Ties over a Long, Long, Long Time.

DNAC Seminar Series
John Levi Martin, U Chicago, Sociology
Persistence and Re-Formation of Close Personal Ties over a Long, Long, Long Time.
March, 16 2015 | 12:30 - 14:00 | Gross Hall 230E

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~ spring break ~

DNAC Seminar Series

March, 9 2015 | - |

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Attacks of modular networks

DNAC Seminar Series
Saray Shai, UNC, Department of Mathematics
Modularity is a key organization principle in many systems around us. Social, technological and biological systems are organized into cohesive groups of elements, called modules. The relatively sparse interactions between the modules are critical to the f
March, 2 2015 | 12:30 - 14:00 | Gross Hall 230E

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Co-evolving Networks of International Conflict and Cooperation

DNAC Seminar Series
Luke Maier, Duke, Public Policy
National security scholars and practitioners have an ongoing need to anticipate future conflict and ways to avert it using non-violent means. The three majors schools of international relations offer alternative predictions about how states behave in the
February, 23 2015 | 12:30 - 14:00 | Gross Hall 230E

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~ cancelled due to snow storm ~

DNAC Seminar Series

February, 16 2015 | 12:30 - 14:00 | Gross Hall 230E

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Check the phone book: Testing information and communication technology (ICT) recall aids for personal network surveys

DNAC Seminar Series
Yuli Patrick Hsieh, RTI, Digital Technology and Society Program
How can medical practitioners at a local clinic encourage residents to come in for cancer screening? How can politicians identify the opinion leaders and information gatekeepers among their constituency? Have Americans become more socially isolated than t
February, 9 2015 | 12:30 - 14:00 | Gross Hall 230E

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Social relationships and survival in a wild primate population

DNAC Seminar Series
Susan Alberts, Duke, Biology
Social integration and support can have profound effects on human survival. The extent of this phenomenon in non-human animals is largely unknown, but such knowledge is important to understanding the evolution of both lifespan and sociality. This topic re
February, 2 2015 | 12:30 - 14:00 | Gross Hall 230E

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Who uses enterprise collaboration systems?

DNAC Seminar Series
Yong-Mi Kim & Jonathon Cummings, University of Michigan, School of Information & Duke, Fuqua School of Business
While public social networking sites, such as Facebook and Twitter, have garnered a lot of attention from academic researchers, private social networking sites within corporations are less well understood. Often referred to as enterprise collaboration sys
January, 26 2015 | 12:30 - 14:00 | Gross Hall 230E

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School Co-Attendance Networks and the Southern Vowel Shift

DNAC Seminar Series
Robin Dodsworth & Richard Benton, NCSU, English & Duke University, Sociology
School Co-Attendance Networks and the Southern Vowel Shift
January, 12 2015 | 12:30 - 14:00 | Gross Hall 230E

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Systems Science Methods and Health Part 1: System Dynamics and Network Analysis

DNAC Seminar Series
Crystal Wiley Cené & Laura Sheble, UNC (School of Medicine) & UNC (Center for Health Equity Research)
We will present a work-in-progress from a larger project/series of papers focused on the use of systems science methods (Systems Dynamics, Individual-based Modelling, and Network Analysis) in health using bibliometrics. We will present a few results from
December, 8 2014 | 12:30 - 14:00 | Gross Hall 230E

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Success by Degrees: Adolescent Popularity and Future Earnings

DNAC Seminar Series
Ying Shi, Duke (Public Policy)
Are there labor market returns to high school popularity? One can reasonably argue that friendship nominations contain valuable information about an individual's social skills and social capital that matter for future employment. We define popularity usi
November, 24 2014 | 12:30 - 14:00 | Gross Hall 230E

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Health Surveillance through Social Networks

DNAC Seminar Series
Weihua (Edward) An, University of Indiana (Statistics)
We propose a network-based method to monitor health behaviors and point out the general conditions for it to work effectively. The method helps to identify effective informants for monitoring future health behaviors and to triangulate self-reports of sens
November, 17 2014 | 12:30 - 14:00 | Gross Hall 230E

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Networks of influence: transmission of information in systems of cooperative decision makers.

DNAC Seminar Series
Malgorzata Turalska, Duke (Physics)
The surprising social phenomena of the Arab Spring and the Occupy Wall Street movement posit the question of whether the active role of committed groups may produce political changes of significant importance. Under what conditions are the convictions of
November, 10 2014 | 12:30 - 14:00 | Gross Hall 230E

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Multivariate Analysis as a Network Problem

DNAC Seminar Series
Ron Breiger, University of Arizona (Sociology)
There was a time when network analysis was concerned exclusively with who-to-whom (“one-mode”) data. Much of the history of network research however has been written as the result of an expanded vision as to what constitutes a network (consider for ex
October, 27 2014 | 12:30 - 14:00 | Gross Hall 230E

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Social environment and social clustering in spread of opinions in co-evolving networks

DNAC Seminar Series
Nishant Malik, UNC (Mathematics)
Taking a pragmatic approach to the processes involved in the phenomena of collective opinion formation, first we investigate two specific modifications to the co-evolving network voter model with multiple opinions. (i) We replace the rewiring probability
October, 20 2014 | 12:30 - 14:00 | Gross Hall 230E

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Cell phones, social networks, and public health

DNAC Seminar Series
Jukka-Pekka Onnela, Havard (Biostatistics at School of Public Health)
Cell phones are now ubiquitous: it is estimated that the number of phones in use exceeds the size of the global population in 2015. Our recent and ongoing work uses call detail records (CDRs) to investigate the structure of large-scale social networks and
October, 6 2014 | 12:30 - 14:00 | 230E Gross Hall

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Bridging and Bonding: How Social Diversity Influences Organizational Performance

DNAC Seminar Series
Brad Fulton, Duke (Sociology)
Although many organizations aspire to be socially diverse, diversity’s consequences for organizational performance remain unclear. Social bridging theories argue that diverse organizations will perform better because they have access to more social reso
September, 29 2014 | 12:30 - 14:00 | 230E Gross Hall

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Social networks, migration and HIV in a new immigration destination

DNAC Seminar Series
Clare Barrington, UNC (Public Global Health)
Latinos in the US are disproportionately affected by HIV and are more likely to present with a late diagnosis compared to non-Latinos, which creates delayed engagement in HIV care and treatment. Social networks are a central driver of Latin American migra
September, 22 2014 | 12:30 - 14:00 | 230E Gross Hall

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Honor as Social Power and Factions as Networks: Understanding the Iranian Political Elite

DNAC Seminar Series
Tony Rivera, NDU (International Security Affairs)
Iranian strategic decision-making remains largely misunderstood by the West. The system in place does make the Supreme Leader the ultimate decision-maker, and it does give the president constitutional authority, and, as in any system, there are multiple i
September, 15 2014 | 12:30 - 14:00 | 230E Gross Hall

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A testing based approach to identifying statistically significant communities in social networks

DNAC Seminar Series
James Wilson, UNC (Statistics & Operations Research)
An important problem in the study of networks is how to divide the vertices of a given network into one or more groups, called communities, in such a way that vertices of the same community are more interconnected than vertices belonging to different ones
September, 8 2014 | 12:30 - 14:00 | 230E Gross Hall

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Complex contagion on noisy geometric networks

DNAC Seminar Series
Dane Taylor, SAMSI and UNC Department of Mathematics
The study of contagion on networks is central to our understanding of collective social processes and epidemiology. However, for networks arising from an underlying manifold such as the Earth’s surface, it remains unclear the extent to which the dynamic
April, 15 2014 | 12:30 - 2:00 | 230E Gross Hall

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Design Everywhere: Natural Machines and the Success (and Failure) of Emergent Networks

DNAC Seminar Series
Anthony Kosner, Forbes
Design is a universal principle present in all things, animate and inanimate, as explained by Adrian Bejan's constructal law. At every scale of matter, time and organization there are design processes at work that recognize differences and exploit those d
April, 8 2014 | 12:30 - 2:00 | 230E Gross Hall

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Temporal latent space network models for dynamic grooming interactions in baboon troops

DNAC Seminar Series
Bailey Fosdick, Duke - SAMSI, statistics
Baboon troops are intriguing social populations as they have strict social hierarchies and about once every fifteen years a given troop will fission into two new troops. Often this occurs according to matrilineal or patrilineal lines, but once in a while,
April, 1 2014 | 12:30 - 2:00 | 230E Gross Hall

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From attribute to quality signal - and back again? The adoption of screwcaps on fine wines, 1970-2012

DNAC Seminar Series
Malte Doehne, ZU Friedrichshafen - Sociology
More than 400 million bottles of wine are adversely affected by faulty cork closures each year. Premium winemakers are well aware of the problem and a solution long exists in form of the screwcap. Used on table wines since the 1930s, it eliminates two of
March, 25 2014 | 12:30 - | 230E Gross Hall

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An agent-based epidemiological model of incarceration

DNAC Seminar Series
Kristian Lum , Virginia Tech-Virginia Bioinformatics Institute
We build an agent-based model of incarceration based on the SIS model of infectious disease propagation. Our central hypothesis is that the observed racial disparities in incarceration rates between Black and White Americans can be explained as the result
March, 18 2014 | - | 230E Gross Hall

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Cultural Superstardom from Multiple Mechanisms: Two Mathematical Models of Cultural Object Popularity

DNAC Seminar Series
Charles Seguin, UNC - Sociology
The popularity of cultural objects such as music recordings, baby names, or novels is characterized by a large number of relatively unpopular “flops” as well as a few superstars that are several orders of magnitude more popular than the average. Desp
February, 25 2014 | 12:30 - 2:00 | 230E Gross Hall

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Quantifying the complexity of Boolean networks

DNAC Seminar Series
Josh Socolar, Duke University - Physics
We study two measures of the complexity of heterogeneous extended systems, taking random Boolean networks as prototypical cases. A measure defined by Shalizi et al. for cellular automata, based on a criterion for optimal statistical prediction [Shalizi
February, 18 2014 | 12:30 - 2:00 | 230E Gross Hall

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Text Networks

DNAC Seminar Series
David Banks, Duke University - Department of Statistical Science
The dynamics of the Wikipedia, political blogs, and computational advertising are all situations in which the analyst can draw upon two kinds of data: information on text in webpages, and network connectivity structure between pages. In principle, each
February, 11 2014 | 12:30 - 2:00 | 230E Gross Hall

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On the Precision of Social and Information Networks

DNAC Seminar Series
Kamesh Munagala , Duke University - Computer Science
The diffusion of information on online social and information networks has been a popular topic of study in recent years, but attention has typically focused on speed of dissemination and recall (i.e. the fraction of users getting a piece of information)
February, 4 2014 | 12:30 - 2:00 | 230E Gross Hall

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Friendship and Natural Selection

DNAC Seminar Series
James Fowler, UCSD - Political Science and Medical Genetics
More than any other species, humans form social ties to individuals who are neither kin nor mates, and these ties tend to be with similar people. Here, we show that this similarity extends to genotypes. Across the whole genome, friends' genotypes at the
January, 28 2014 | 12:30 - 2:00 | 230E Gross Hall

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Methodological Considerations in the Use of Name Generators and Interpreters

DNAC Seminar Series
David Eagle, Duke University - Sociology Department

January, 21 2014 | 12:30 - 2:00 | 230E Gross Hall

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Intra-Organizational Job Mobility Networks and Wage Inequality

DNAC Seminar Series
Steve McDonald, NCSU - Sociology
Despite the increasing prevalence of job mobility across work organizations, internal job moves remain a common yet relatively understudied aspect of work careers. The movement of individuals across jobs within an organization could therefore help to expl
January, 14 2014 | 12:30 - 2:00 | 230E Gross Hall

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Sampling a hidden population without a sampling frame: A practical application of Network Sampling with Memory.

DNAC Seminar Series
Ted Mouw, UNC - Chapel Hill
Mouw and Verdery (2012) show that it is possible to increase the efficiency of sampling from a hidden population by collecting network information as part of the survey. They propose a new method, “Network Sampling with Memory” (NSM) that information
December, 3 2013 | 12:30 - 2:00 | 230E Gross Hall

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Multilevel Constraint on Social Interaction Regarding Science

DNAC Seminar Series
Brian Southwell, RTI International, Duke, & UNC-Chapel Hill
Communication researchers are increasingly drawn toward social network concepts in explaining public understanding of science. Some of the resulting work is theoretically underdeveloped, however, as pundits and scholars look for
November, 26 2013 | 12:30 - 2:00 | 230E Gross Hall

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Network Analysis Techniques for a Hard-to-reach Population

DNAC Seminar Series
Daniel Heard, Duke University - Department of Statistical Science
This work examines a community of men who have sex with men (MSM) in southern India with a high HIV rate. The data is from an ego-centric study and includes attributes such as religion, age, marital status, caste, sex position, religion, and whether an in
November, 12 2013 | 12:30 - 2:00 |

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Genes, Networks, and Babies: The Causes and Consequences of Social Behavior in Nonhuman Primates

DNAC Seminar Series
Lauren Brent, Duke University - Center for Cogntive Neuroscience

November, 5 2013 | 12:30 - 2:00 | 230E Gross Hall

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The Power of Meta-Networks for Rapid Ethnographic Assessment

DNAC Seminar Series
Kathleen Carley, School of Computer Science - Carnegie Mellon University
Meta-Networks are high dimensional interlinked multi-mode and multi-link networks that can vary by time and space. They can be rapidly extracted from media data such as on-line news and social media. When this is done, the resultant analysis provides ke
October, 29 2013 | 12:30 - 2:00 | 230E Gross Hall

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New methods for inference from Respondent-Driven Sampling Data

DNAC Seminar Series
Krista Gile, UMass Amherst - Statistics
Respondent-Driven Sampling is type of link-tracing network sampling used to study hard-to-reach populations. Beginning with a convenience sample, each person sampled is given 2-3 uniquely identified coupons to distribute to other members of the target po
October, 22 2013 | 12:30 - 2:00 | 230E Gross Hall

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Random self-similar trees: models, statistical inference, and applications

DNAC Seminar Series
Ilya Zaliapin, University of Nevada, Reno - Department of Mathematics and Statistics
Hierarchical branching organization is ubiquitous in nature. It is readily seen in river basins, drainage networks, bronchial passages, botanical trees, lightening, and snowflakes, to mention but a few. Notably, empirical evidence reveals a surprising sim
October, 8 2013 | 12:30 - 2:00 | 230E Gross Hall

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Using multiple data sources to evaluate Respondent Driven Sampling (RDS) and explore new approaches to studying hidden and hard to reach populations

DNAC Seminar Series
Ashton Verdery, UNC Chapel Hill - Dept of Sociology
This presentation summarizes a set of recent papers on RDS and discusses new approaches to the study of hidden populations. We summarize work from an empirical RDS study conducted among female sex workers in China. In this newer work we evaluate the bias
October, 1 2013 | 12:30 - 2:00 | 230E Gross Hall

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An Application of Ecological Network Analysis to Predict the Impacts of Seawater Intrusion on an Estuarine Nitrogen Cycle

DNAC Seminar Series
David Hines, Department of Biology and Marine Biology - UNC Wilmington

September, 24 2013 | 12:30 - 2:00 | 230E Gross Hall

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Assessing Measurements of Social Capital: Investigation of Four Typical Social Capital Measurements

DNAC Seminar Series
Nan Lin and Hang Young Lee, Duke Sociology

September, 17 2013 | 12:30 - 2:00 | 230E Gross Hall

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RefCliq: The Networked World of Academic Citations

DNAC Seminar Series
Neal Caren, Sociology - Duke

September, 10 2013 | 12:30 - 2:00 | 230E Gross Hall

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Using Social Networks for More Accurate Voting and Marketing

DNAC Seminar Series
Vincent Conitzer, Computer Science and Economics - Duke

September, 3 2013 | 12:30 - 2:00 | 230E Gross Hall

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Homophily, Contagion, Confounding: Pick Any Three

DNAC Seminar Series
Cosma Shalizi, Statistics Department - Carnegie Mellon University
Individuals near each other in a social network tend to behave
April, 2 2013 | 12:30 - 2:00 | 329 Soc/Psych Building

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International Linkages and Liberalization of Abortion: Competing Institutional Logics and International Organization Networks

DNAC Seminar Series
Dong-Ju Lee, Harvard University - Department of Sociology
Abortion laws, despite their critical roles in political and social debates, have received little attention from comparative sociologists. This paper studies the worldwide liberalization of abortion laws among 202 countries during 1920-2007, focusing on t
March, 26 2013 | 12:30 - 2:00 | 329 Soc/Psych Building (McKinney Room)

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Constructal Law of Design and Evolution in Nature

DNAC Seminar Series
Adrian Bejan, Duke University - Department of Mechanical Engineering and Material Sciences
The reoccurring patterns of nature have long puzzled even the most devoted proponents of chance and Darwin’s theory of evolution. But the Constructal Law changes the terms of this debate, and shows that a single law of physics governs the “design”
March, 19 2013 | 12:30 - | Room 329 Sociology/Psychology Building

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Latent space models for multiview network data: An approach to understanding social structure in Twitter

DNAC Seminar Series
Tyler McCormick, University of Washington - Department of Statistics, Sociology

March, 5 2013 | 12:30 - 2:00 | 329 Soc/Psych Building (McKinney Room)

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Throughflow centrality reveals important species in ecosystems and environmental impacts of shrimp trawling in Core Sound, NC.

DNAC Seminar Series
Stuart Borrett, UNC, Wilmington - Systems Ecology and Ecoinformatics Laboratory
Centrality is a common tool for characterizing node importance in network science, but it is rarely used in ecology. Here, I introduce throughflow centrality as a global indicator of node importance for the energy-matter flow dynamics ON networks. I the
February, 26 2013 | 12:30 - 2:00 | 329 Soc/Psych Building (McKinney Room)

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Telling a fuller story of research impact with altmetrics and ImpactStory

DNAC Seminar Series
Jason Priem, School of Information and Library Science, UNC-Chapel Hill
In growing numbers, the workflows of scholars are moving online. As that happens, important parts of the scientific process, once hidden, are being exposed. Conversations, arguments, recommendations, reads, bookmarks--the stuff of day-to-day science--is l
February, 12 2013 | 12:30 - 2:00 | Soc/Psych 329 (McKinney Room)

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Influence, Selection, and Activity: Social Structure and Processes in Medicare Lobbying and Agenda Setting.

DNAC Seminar Series
John Scott, Department of Public Policy - University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
By what process do interest group representatives select the issues on which they lobby the Congress? Any one policy area often has dozens or even hundreds of proposed bills and equally as many interest groups and stakeholders. In a crowded and competit
February, 5 2013 | 12:30 - 2:00 | 329 Soc/Psych Building (McKinney Room)

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Topic Modeling in Blog Networks

DNAC Seminar Series
David Banks and Justin Gross, Duke University - Department of Statistical Science; University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill - Department of Political Science
Justin Gross and David Banks will lead a discussion on a new research project to apply topic model methods to understand the dynamics of political blog networks. In some approximate sense, the _New York Times_ is the beating heart of the political blogos
January, 22 2013 | 12:30 - 2:00 | 329 Soc/Psych Building (McKinney Room)

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Gaining Knowledge Expertise Through Social Networks

DNAC Seminar Series
Christina Prell, University of Maryland - Sociology Department
If knowledge expertise is a form of ‘stock capital’ that actors can pursue, what role do social networks play in helping actors attain this goal? Ron Burt discusses the ‘network entrepreneur’ as an actor that pursues the role of a broker, spannin
December, 4 2012 | 12:30 - | 329 Soc/Psych Building (McKinney Room)

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NeuroRhetoric: Mapping the semantic structure of cognitive neuroscience

DNAC Seminar Series
Greg Applebaum, Duke University - Duke Institute for Brain Sciences

November, 6 2012 | - | 329 Soc/Psych Building (McKinney Room)

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Network Sampling Coverage in RDS: How Much of the Network Do We See?

DNAC Seminar Series
Jeffrey A. Smith, M. Giovanna Merli, James Moody, Jing Li, Sharon Weir, Duke University - Sociology Department, Immunology; University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill - School of Public Health
Here we provide a first look at some work we are doing to evaluate the geographic coverage rates in a given respondent driven sample case. The project involves lots of bits DNAC members might find fun: an RDS on commercial sex workers in China with augme
October, 23 2012 | - | 329 Soc/Psych Building (McKinney Room)

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Measuring Social Change as Categorical Change: Race and Education in America

DNAC Seminar Series
Jeff Smith, Duke University - Sociology Department
Sociologists often depict demographic categories as socially constructed, non-essential, and fluid. In practice, however, social trends still typically reflect the changing outcomes (e.g. health, income) of fixed, exogenous demographic categories. The goa
October, 2 2012 | 12:30 - 2:00 | 329 Soc/Psych Building (McKinney Room)

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Removal Centrality: A Comparative Evaluation of System-Influence Centrality Measures

DNAC Seminar Series
James Moody, Peter Mucha and S. Joshua Mendelsohn, Duke University - Sociology Department; University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill - Department of Mathematics

September, 25 2012 | - | 329 Soc/Psych Building (McKinney Room)

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Uncommon Collaborators: How Network Ties Enable and Constrain Organizational Action

DNAC Seminar Series
Brad Fulton, Duke University - Sociology Department
Most social capital research analyzes how involvement in voluntary associations benefits individuals or collectives. Rarely does it address how social capital affects voluntary associations themselves; in particular, how inter-organizational ties enable a
September, 4 2012 | 12:30 - | 329 Soc/Psych Building (McKinney Room)

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An Agent-Based Model of the Human Brain

DNAC Seminar Series
Karen Joyce, Wake Forest - Department of Biomedical Engineering
Agent-based modeling is a great utility for studying complex systems, where the comprising components are typically very simple, but the assembled whole often exhibits sophisticated emergent behavior. Agent based modeling is a
April, 24 2012 | 12:00 PM - 1:30 PM | 329 Soc/Psych Building (McKinney Room)

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Terms of Endearment: An Equilibrium Model of Sex and Matching

DNAC Seminar Series
Peter Arcidiacono, Duke University - Department of Economics

April, 10 2012 | 12:00 - 1:30 | Soc/Psych Building Room 329

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Corporate Social Capital in Chinese Guanxi Culture

DNAC Seminar Series
Yanjie Bian, University of Minnesota - Department of Sociology
We present a conceptualization of corporate social capital within the context of Chinese guanxi culture. Sociologists have defined corporate social capital as “processes of forming and mobilizing social actors’ network connections within and between o
April, 3 2012 | 12:00 PM - 1:30 PM | 329 Soc/Psych Building (McKinney Room)

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Shanghai Sexual Mixing: Are sexual contact patterns in Shanghai compatible with an HIV/AIDS epidemic?

DNAC Seminar Series
Giovanna Merli, James Moody, Robin Gauthier, and S Joshua Mendelsohn, Duke University

March, 20 2012 | 12:00 PM - 1:30 PM | 329 Soc/Psych Building (McKinney Room)

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Dual Embeddedness and Institutional Transference: Network-based Job Finding and Macro-Institutional Dynamics in Germany and the United States

DNAC Seminar Series
Steve McDonald, North Carolina State University - Department of Sociology
This project explores how differences in institutional context (across space and time) impact social relations, with a specific focus on network-based job finding behavior--finding jobs through personal contacts. First, cross-national survey data are used
February, 21 2012 | 12:00 PM - | Duke University - 329 Soc/Psych (McKinney Rm)

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Leveraging social networks for health promotion: The promise and perils of peer-to-peer information sharing

DNAC Seminar Series
Brian Southwell, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill - School of Journalism and Mass Communication

February, 14 2012 | 12:00 PM - | Duke University - 329 Soc/Psych (McKinney Rm)

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Reconstructing the Ship of Theseus: Groups, Roles & Trajectories in Early Adolescent Friendship Networks

DNAC Seminar Series
James Moody, Duke University - Department of Sociology

February, 7 2012 | 12:00 PM - 1:30 PM | Duke University - 329 Soc/Psych (McKinney Rm)

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Peter Mucha will be discussing research on network clustering

DNAC Seminar Series
Peter Mucha, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill - Department of Mathematics

January, 31 2012 | 12:00 PM - 1:30 PM | Duke University - 329 Soc/Psych (McKinney Rm)

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Social Networks & Health: The Power of Connectivity

Workshop
Tom Valente, University of Southern California - Department of Preventive Medicine
Valente will discuss the field of social network analysis and introduce several key hypotheses that show how networks influence behavior. Valente will present data from individual and community level studies on adolescent smoking, substance use, community
December, 8 2011 | 3:30 PM - 5:30 PM | Rhodes Conference Rm. Sanford School of Public Policy

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Scalable Tracking of Dynamic Networks

DNAC Seminar Series
Rebecca Willett,
Online optimization methods are useful in a variety of applications with sequential observations of a dynamic environment. Often such methods are designed to minimize an accumulated loss metric, and the analysis techniques are appealing because of their a
November, 28 2011 | 12:45 - 2:00 | Duke University - 329 Soc/Psych (McKinney Rm)

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Linear Social Networks Models

Workshop
Steven N. Durlauf, University of Wisconsin at Madison - Department of Economics
This paper provides a systematic analysis of identification in linear social networks models. This is both a theoretical and an econometric exercise in that it links identification analysis to a rigorously delineated model of interdependent decisions. We
November, 17 2011 | 3:30 - |

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Linear Social Networks Models

DNAC Seminar Series
Steven Durlauf, University of Wisconsin - Dept of Economics
TBA
November, 17 2011 | TBA - TBA | Duke University

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Novelty, metaknowledge, and models of discovery

DNAC Seminar Series
Jacob Foster, University of Chicago - Department of Sociology
What makes an idea
November, 8 2011 | 2:50 - 3:50 | Hudson Hall 125

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Contagious Capital: A Network Analysis of Interconnected Intermediaries

DNAC Seminar Series
Jesse Blocher, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill - Kenan-Flagler Business School
I apply network analysis to portfolio managers linked through interconnected asset holdings and find that they are susceptible to capital flow shocks experienced by nearby neighbors. These shocks not only affect immediate neighbors, but propagate and spil
November, 7 2011 | 12:45 - 2:00 | Duke University - 329 Soc/Psych (McKinney Rm)

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Ideological Extremity and Primary Success: A Social Network Approach

DNAC Seminar Series
David Sparks, Duke University - Department of Political Science

October, 24 2011 | 12:45 - 2:00 | Duke University - 329 Soc/Psych (McKinney Rm)

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Mining Text Networks

DNAC Seminar Series
David Banks, Duke University - Department of Statistical Science

October, 4 2011 | 12:45 - 2:00 | Duke University - 329 Soc/Psych (McKinney Rm)

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Inferring Global Networks from Local Samples

DNAC Seminar Series
Jeff Smith, Duke University - Dept of Sociology

September, 19 2011 | 12:45 PM - 2:00 PM | Duke University - 329 Soc/Psych (McKinney Rm)

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Internet Privacy: It is not getting better

DNAC Seminar Series
Balachander Krishnamurthy, AT&T
The leakage of privacy on the Internet continues unabated. I will present results from a number of studies over the last five years that show increasing aggregation of user-related data by a steadily decreasing number of entities. I will present details o
September, 12 2011 | 12:45 - 14:00 | Duke University, Soc-Psych 329

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General Meeting

DNAC Seminar Series
DNAC Affiliates, Duke Network Analysis Center

September, 5 2011 | 12:30 - 14:00 | 329 Soc/Psych (the McKinney Room)

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Complex Networks Transition Workshop

Workshop
Complex Networks Transition Workshop, SAMSI
This workshop provides a time to look back over the achievements of the SAMSI Complex Networks program and to highlight directions for future research.
June, 6 2011 | 09:00 - 17:00 | 19 T.W. Alexander Drive. Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-4006

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Development rooted in interwoven networks

DNAC Seminar Series
Philip Benfey, Duke University – Dept of Biology
Discusses the genetic networks that control cell identity within the Arabidopsis root and their relationship to the resulting physical network of branching roots.
April, 25 2011 | - | Duke University – 329 Soc/Psych

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Introduction to Social Network Analysis (Mini-Course)

Course
James Moody, Duke University - Dept of Sociology
This two-part mini workshop provides an overview of social network research. It focuses on the tools, measures and modeling strategies most commonly used in social network analysis.
April, 21 2011 | 9:00am - 5:00pm |

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Using network analysis to study care-coordination system for children with complex-chronic conditions

DNAC Seminar Series
Savithri Nageswaran, Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center
Children with complex chronic conditions (CCC) receive care from diverse medical, educational and social service providers through various agencies for a prolonged period of time. Coordination of care between providers serving these children is lacking i
April, 18 2011 | 12:30 - 2:00 |

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Modeling the content of science: The case of HIV/AIDS research, 1990-2008

DNAC Seminar Series
Ryan Light, University of Oregon - Dept of Sociology
The story of scientific change is typically told in one of two ways: a historical focus on the great scientists or a more sociological approach that focuses on the networks of production through co-authorship or credit through co-citation. The former ofte
April, 11 2011 | 12:30 - 14:00 | 329 Soc/Psych, Duke University

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Social Structure of Facebook Networks

DNAC Seminar Series
Mason Porter, University of Oxford - Dept of Mathematics

April, 4 2011 | 12:00pm - 2:00pm |

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The Microsociology of Interdisciplinarity: Graduate students as networked social actors and cultural objects in motion

DNAC Seminar Series
Regina Smardon, University of Virginia - Institute for Advanced Studies In Culture
Our research is based on a one-year ethnographic study of an interdisciplinary cancer research center which in turn was part of a larger mixed methods NSF funded study investigating the social organization of innovation. We explore the role of graduate st
March, 28 2011 | 12:30 - 14:00 | 329 Soc/Psych, Duke University

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Complex Networks: Dynamics on Networks

DNAC Seminar Series
Complex Networks: Dynamics on Networks, SAMSI
The SAMSI working group Dynamics ON Networks has been studying this question for evolutionary games and various models of the spread of opinions and epidemics, both for tree like random networks and for clustered networks. The main purpose of this worksho
March, 21 2011 | 08:30 - 13:00 | 19 T.W. Alexander Drive. Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-4006

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Voter models in the age of Facebook, iPads, and Sarah Palin

DNAC Seminar Series
Rick Durrett, Duke University - Dept of Mathematics
TBA
March, 14 2011 | 12:30 - 14:00 | 329 Soc/Psych, Duke University

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Estimated Sampling Variance in RDS

DNAC Seminar Series
Ashton Verdery and Ted Mouw, UNC Sociology
This project explores the reliability of RDS estimates of variance, using random walk simulations of facebook networks data. The results suggest that RDS variance estimates do not accurately indicate when the true variance is high.
February, 28 2011 | 12:30 - 14:00 | 329 Soc/Psych, Duke University

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Simulation Models for Diffusion over Multirelational Dynamic Networks

DNAC Seminar Series
James Moody, Duke Sociology
TBA
February, 21 2011 | 12:30 - 14:00 | 329 Soc/Psych, Duke University

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How Much Does it Cost to have a Baby? Differences in Perceptions of the Cost of Childbearing

DNAC Seminar Series
Heather Rackin, Duke Sociology
TBA
February, 7 2011 | 12:30 - 14:00 | 329 Soc/Psych, Duke University

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The Structure of Consensus: Cohesion and Hierarchy in Peer Networks

DNAC Seminar Series
Robin Gauthier, Duke Sociology
This paper presents the effect of density and hierarchy on normative consensus. I present a two-by-two typology of social networks characterized by their level of density and hierarchy (low-low, low-high, high-low, high-high). I use the ergm package to si
February, 7 2011 | 12:30 - 14:00 | 329 Soc/Psych, Duke University

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Local Cities, Global Influence

DNAC Seminar Series
S Joshua Mendelsohn, Duke Sociology
What makes a global city? Some scholars have argued that global cities occupy structurally advantageous positions within the global network, while others have focused on special processes that occur between the city and its region, imbuing the city with d
February, 7 2011 | 12:30 - 14:00 | 329 Soc/Psych, Duke University

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Macrostructure from Survey Data: Generating Whole Systems from Ego Networks

DNAC Seminar Series
Jeff Smith, Duke Sociology
TBA
January, 31 2011 | 12:30 - 14:00 | 329 Soc/Psych, Duke University

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Markets or Networks? Rural Households' Borrowing Choices in Western China

DNAC Seminar Series
Yanlong Zhang, Duke Sociology
TBA
January, 31 2011 | 12:30 - 14:00 | 329 Soc/Psych, Duke University

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Strategic Interaction and Networks

DNAC Seminar Series
Rachel Kranton, Duke Economics
This paper brings a general network analysis to a wide class of economic games. A network, or interaction matrix, tells who directly interacts with whom. A major challenge is determining how network structure shapes overall outcomes. We have a striking re
January, 24 2011 | 12:30 - 14:00 | 329 Soc/Psych, Duke University

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Complex Networks: Dynamics of Networks Workshop

DNAC Seminar Series
Complex Networks: Dynamics of Networks Workshop, SAMSI
TBA
January, 10 2011 | 08:30 - 15:30 | 19 T.W. Alexander Drive. Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-4006

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Longitudinal Analysis of Networks: Temporal Exponential Random Graph Models, their Estimation, and Applications

DNAC Seminar Series
Skyler Cranmer, UNC Political Science
TBA
December, 9 2010 | 12:30 - 14:00 | 329 Soc/Psych, Duke University

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Using network structure to estimate latent features in hard-to-reach populations

DNAC Seminar Series
Tyler McCormick, Columbia Statistics
We propose network-based statistical models for learning about groups which are difficult to reach using standard surveys, such as the homeless or individuals with HIV/AIDS. Rather than sampling directly, we reach these individuals through their social ne
November, 18 2010 | 12:30 - 14:00 | 329 Soc/Psych, Duke University

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Multiscale Analysis on Graphs

DNAC Seminar Series
Mauro Maggioni, Duke Mathematics
We present a technique for viewing weighted undirected graphs at multiple scales by homogenizing the natural random walk at different time scales. This leads to multiscale representations of the graph itself, as well as of functions on the graph. We discu
November, 11 2010 | 12:30 - 14:00 | 329 Soc/Psych, Duke University

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Dynamics of Boolean Networks

DNAC Seminar Series
Joshua Socolar, Duke Physics
I will describe in broad terms the behavior of networks consisting of binary elements that perform Boolean logic functions on their inputs, emphasizing issues that arise in applications to gene regulation and to free-running digital electronic circuits.
November, 4 2010 | 12:30 - 14:00 | 329 Soc-Psych, Duke University

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Complex Networks Modeling Workshop

DNAC Seminar Series
Complex Networks Modeling Workshop, SAMSI
The goal of this workshop is to bring together researchers working on the sampling, modeling, and inference of networks, for the purpose of helping move the current state of knowledge on these inter-related tasks to rest on a more principled and integrate
October, 20 2010 | 08:30 - 15:30 | 19 T.W. Alexander Drive. Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-4006

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5th Annual Duke Systems Biology Symposium

DNAC Seminar Series
5th Annual Duke Systems Biology Symposium, Duke Institute for Genome Sciences and Policy
The Duke Center for Systems Biology and the Duke Institute for Genome Sciences & Policy announce the 5th Annual Duke Systems Biology Symposium, to be held on the campus of Duke University on Thursday, October 7th 2010. Attendance is free and open to all.
October, 7 2010 | 08:30 - 18:00 | French Family Sciences Center, Duke University

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Complex Networks: Theory and Applications

Course
Complex Networks: Theory and Applications, SAMSI
This course will focus on the mathematical and statistical analysis and modeling of networked systems, such as arise in biological, social, and technological contexts.
September, 7 2010 | 16:30 - 19:00 | 19 T.W. Alexander Drive. Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-4006

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2010-11 Program on Complex Networks Opening Tutorials & Workshop

Workshop
Program on Complex Networks - Opening Tutorials & Workshop, SAMSI
TBA
August, 29 2010 | 08:30 - 15:30 | 19 T.W. Alexander Drive. Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-4006

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